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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 341 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the united states. hundreds of libyans amassed outside the consulate, airing signs denouncing yesterday's violent destruction which led to the death of u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three others. in addition libyan authorities arrested four men suspected of instigating the protests. president obama called both egyptian president morsi and magariaf. the two calls had decidedly different tones. president obama expressed appreciation to libyan president magariaf for the cooperation received from the libyan government and people in responding to the attack. though questions still remain about the role libyan terrorists played in escalating the attacks. with respect to egypt the president had made an interesting comment in an interview earlier yesterday with telemundo. >> would you consider the current egyptian regime an ally of the united states? >> obama: i don't think that we would consider them an ally but we don't consider them an enemy. >> eliot: against this backdrop, president obama's phone call with egyptia
the murder thursday of four american diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
of the united states and i think he really did make it worse by sitting down with "the view." i love "the view," i love the show, they're all friends. i'm a big fan. but in was not the moment to sit down with "the view." that's done by mitt romney, by barack obama, by everyone else. but not this day and at this time. >> jamie rubin, there is a schedule. obviously that the campaign feels it wants to keep. they have a lot of events coming up just today. joe scarborough said this morning so meet with folks for 15 minutes. to something. what would you say about this? >> well, i come from the foreign policy side of the house and worked at the state department and the president's schedule would come up in meetings with the white house. and there's always this tension between the election calculations, the political calculations, and those in the foreign policy professionals. you know, from the standpoint of a professional, obviously you'd like to see the president engage with these crucial countries, not just our friend israel, but a lot of friends that we have in the world or as andrea put it, coun
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
. each of these countries representing a major national security concern for the united states. sudan gets over $2.5 billion american aid in american aid and that is just over the last four years. tanisha was the birthplace of the arab spring movement. the u.s. is providing it with regular assistance. yemen has received $620 million from america over the last four years. our own reporter, greg, has more in london. reporter: it is supposed to be a holy day of prayer. we have been watching the feeds coming in from all over the word and it is anything but that. violence wracking capital after capital. particularly in the united states. just to give you a little bit more context, as you noted, tanisha is the birthplace of the arab spring. the government ought to be more moderate. something we could depend on. in fact, we have seen extremist elements that work there. at the u.s. embassy there, as well as the nearby schools. the latest word we are getting from them is that security forces have done their jobs. over in sudan, the one-time home of osama bin laden. extremist elements thereto.
and are receiving reports this morning of the attacks against the united states embsy in cairo and the u.s. consulate in bengazi in libya. in libya, our ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in the service of our nation. our thoughts and sympathies today are with the families of these brave americans. these attacks remind us of the sacrifices made on a daily basisaway foreign service officers, diplomatic security personnel and our marine security guards. i joi my colleagues in strongly condemning the murder of these innocent americans, and i strongly support employing every available tool at our dissal to ensure t safety of americans overseas and to hunt down those responsible for these attacks. yesterday, we commemorated the anniversary of the attacks of september 11, and today we are reminded that brave americans serve us every day at the risk of their own lives. we honor the americans we lost in libya and we will stand united in our response. among the things we can agree on in washington is that the attacks on the u.s. and its representatives ll be met with r
is it perceived as weakness? >> because the united states has essentially abandoned the rhetoric and approach about the war on terror out of a mistaken view somehow the war on terror is offensive to all muslims. that is simple minded view of the muslim world to begin with and fails to recognize how much harm terrorism has brought to muslims. it also shows a declining withdrawing america from iraq, from afghanistan, not being able to deal with terrorism in places like syria and the gaza strip and not being able to restrain iran and support for terrorism and nuclear weapons program. all of that continues of the impression of declining united states. >> jamie: and increasing sentiment of anti-americanism in places we wouldn't have expected it and those perceived as allies like pakistan in the news today. the question is, can this sentiment not only be from the protestors and from the treasureists of the world but also from the governments of these countries that we need to count as our allies in a war against terror? >> pakistan is very, very difficult country from the u.s. perspective and in th
to bless the united states of america. thank you. >> a somber u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, talking about thettack that killed four americans in benghazi, libya, including u.s. ambassador, chris stevens with a moving tribute to him and the others. she said this is an attack that should attack the conscience of people of all faiths around the world. we should tell you and we can take a live look at the white house right now. we are also waiting for a statement from president obama about the death of ambassador chris stevens in addition we are also going to be hearing from mitt romney a little later. let's go to our white house correspondent, chuck todd. >> i think we will hear similar words. but it's important that you did hear from secretary clinton first, and let me tell you why. thesediplomats. there are friends and donors in the safe countries in the safe allies, and then people like chris stevens who work under any administration, democrat or republican, and this was almost an attempt bisect clinton as a morale boost to the other career diplomats that are working in cou
on america in our history. today people gather across the united states, around the world to remember the tragic events on 9/11. some take part in ceremonies like this. others spent time in quiet reflection and prayer. all of us take a moment to remember again where we were at that fateful moment. here together as one family, we pause to honor and to pray and to remember the 184 lives lost at the pentagon. more than 2700 killed in lower manhattan. and the 40 who perished in that field in pennsylvania on flight 93. these victims families remember those who were lost as mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. the family members here today know that the entire nation joins you in mourning the loss of your loved ones. we're honored by your presence and just as your loved ones are heroes for ever, so are all of you. today we also recognize and remember other heroes, those first responders who rushed to the scene behind me into the fire to save lives and help in anyway possible. we owe all of you a special debt. we appreciate all you do it to provide aid and comfort t
have been telling us that for months now they've been warning the united states about this growing extremist threat and that they have been growing ever more concerned about how little control they actually themselves have over the situation. >> arwa, please be careful over there in benghazi. we'll stay in close touch. arwa damon, one of our courageous journalists. the egyptian capital is tense, the u.s. embassy is tense. ben wedeman, what's going on now? are they out in tahrir square? >> at the moment it's gone relatively quiet. ta tahrir square looks normal, given it's 3:00 a.m.. in the streets below me, just a few protesters milling around. we haven't heard the bang of tear gas being fired by the security forces. this day could have been much worse in egypt. the muslim brotherhood had called for nationwide protests against this offensive youtube video that sparked this crisis, but at the last moment they cancelled those protests. so really we've seen a small protest outside the u.s. consulate in alexandria. here in cairo the numbers are down. it's important to keep in mind there
. >> the cruel irony here is that the united states is well-regarded in libya. and there's a moderate government in place. and this is clearly the actions of an isolated and very small but very vicious terrorist group. and so we've got to protect ourselves from those groups. and we've got to go after them. >> reporter: and, wolf, as i said, we're expecting momentarily a briefing background here at the state department. there are a lot of details. everyone that we talk to says that it was a very, very complex almost chaotic situation. fighting on the outside. fire on the inside. and so we expect to have more details as we go along. >> and so far we've only been told the names of chris stephens and sean smith. the other two they have not released their names yet, is that right? >> yes. they were security officials. >> not u.s. marines though? >> reporter: no. we understand were not marines. they were security personnel. >> let us know what happens at this background briefing you're about to get. and you'll update our viewers. standby for that. jill dougherty. let's go to nic robertson now in londo
there simply as a diversion. four americans died including the united states ambassador to libya chris stevens. our foreign affairs correspondent, jill dougherty, has been working her sources to get a better idea on exactly what happened. our senior international correspondent nic robertson is monitoring the search for who's responsible. and our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is keeping tabs on the u.s. military's response to what's going on as well. let's go to jill first. she's watching what's going on. jill, what's the latest over at the state department beyond the heartbreak of a top u.s. diplomat, three others killed? >> right, wolf. just in a few minutes we're expecting an update, a briefing on background by senior officials here at the state department. but for now this is what we know based on the conversations and what we are hearing from u.s. officials. tuesday night at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, a complex and highly dangerous situation. outside an anti-american protest. then a group of heavily armed militants, approximately two dozen of them, launched an attack firing ro
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the long-term. despite the bumpy path and the disturbing images, it's in the united states fundamental interest that people have the ability to choose their own governments, that the governments be democratic and free. that's in our long-term best interest. we need to reinforce that. >> we are in the middle of a heated presidential campaign. there are different foreign policy visions. that's why we wanted to dedicate the hour today to understand these different views. mitt romney spoke out this week, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kin
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
, criticizing the administration, talking about whether the united states was apologizing for some of the initial response to this. these were his comments this week. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. i think it's a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> our embassies did not stand up for free speech in this initial response to this violence. and the republican charge is that it's weakness on the part of this administration that invites this kind of chaos that the administration has not been tough enough on radical extremists that are beginning to take root in these countries. how do you respond to that? >> first of all, i think the american people and certainly our diplomats and development experts putting their lives on the line every day around the world expect from our leadership unity in times of challenge. and strong, steady, steadfast leadership of the sort that president obama has been providing. with respect to this, i think,
with an incumbent president of the united states. host: from the associated press this morning -- back to the phones and our discussion regarding early voting beginning in about 36 states. missouri is when we get our next phone call, and that is dan on the line for republicans. caller: good morning. i was going to say right off the bat, everybody in the united states should go see the movie "obama 2016." a gentleman said this movie up who went to college with obama. it goes through his life, his family, and his agenda for america. host: now you have plug the movie. tell us if you are in favor of early voting. caller: absolutely. the elderly have a problem, but also the working people. they have to go really early or really late. sometimes they do not get to vote. it is important to have early voting. i know of the debates are nice to watch. most of us already know who we are going to vote for. i know our country is sinking fast. if we do not get something done about the national debt, the port and the rich and everybody is down the tube. host:we haev a tweet from max that says -- is that where a lot
.s.. a complex and fluid situation, back to you. >> gretchen: thank you. >> brian: how does the united states respond? former director of national intelience who worked in the worst situation . ambassador, welcome. what is our best next step first of course in libya? >> let mow say that chris stevens, we lost an exemptary diplomat. he was the kind of example of expeditionary diplomacy that characterized our hot spots . we will mourn his loss and miss him greatly. as far as the next step, we have to wait this situation out a bit and at least get past the friday prayers tomorrow and see how that works out. i am certain the images that you are showing on the screen this morning are not representative of the views of the governments and the peoples of those countries. i don't think they want to see this, their countries descend in chaos. >> steve: you were the director of the national intelligence agency, we didn't see this coming, how is that possible in >> first of all as you recall in the arab pring and what happened in tunisia, sometimes these incidents can be sparked by an unanticipatedentio
be a movement for the united states to withdraw to fortress america, to renounce our -- our -- our service to the world in helping these countries achieve the same democracy and freedom that our forefathers strived for? i do not mean to use his death as any kind of political agenda, but i think my friend and i remember him well enough to know that the worst outcome of this tragedy wod be for the united states to withdraw. in fact, i am confident that if he were here, he would be urging us to get right back in, get -- bring these extremists to justice and press on with the democracy and freedom that the people of libya deserve and have earned at great loss of blood and treasure. mr. lieberman: mr. president, i couldn't agree more with my friend from arizona. it would -- it would really dishonor the service of chris stevens and the three other americans who served us in libya if their murders by these extremists led us to retrench and pull out of libya and stop supporting the new libyan government, democratically elecd, pull out of other parts of the arab world. that would be exactly the opp
to the united states. >> i think the componts, the resolution of the iranian crisis there has to be negotiation, there has to be sanctions, there has to be a credible threat of war and there has to be a ladder to enable the regime to climb down. if you have all four elements in play then you can have a peaceful resolution to all of these. but if you look at it, i'm not happy, i should say this very clearly. i'm not happy with the way our foreign policy and doe midwest i can politics have become intertwined. i'm not happy at the rift between the prime minister and the administration. when he said we need to see red lines, secretary clinton said there are not going to be red lines. >> rose: we conclude with best selling author michael lewis talking about a new article he has in "vanity fair" about president obama. >> i thought what would be a fun piece of journalism to do? and i just had been struck through the course not just of this man's administration, this president's administration but previous ones just kind of a dysjuncture between the commentary on the outside and what it kind of seemed
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 341 (some duplicates have been removed)